Discovering Anglesey

Discovering Anglesey

The Isle of Anglesey boasts 125 miles of glorious coastline which is best experienced on a walk along the Coastal Path. The majority of the region is classified as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and it attracts a multitude of photographers and wildlife enthusiasts every year.

The history of the Isle of Anglesey dates back centuries. It was a very important place for ancient Druids and Celts and has since been attacked by the Romans, invaded by Vikings, Saxons, Normans, the Irish and not to forget, the English. Anglesey has incredibly fertile soil and rich unspoilt farmland and this produced vast stores of grains, vegetables and meat which was used to feed the rest of the country.

During the industrial revolution in the 18th century; the wealth of the island was noticed by the rest of the country. Wealthy landowners from Cheshire spotted the great potential of Anglesey; the ability to yield bigger riches than just wheat.

Evidence of copper mining dating back 4,000 years was found, but it was in the late 1700’s that production really took off. The mine at Parys Mountain became the largest in Europe and even produced its own coin, the Parys Penny.

Menai Bridge

With the industrial revolution came long awaited transport facilities improvements; and in 1826 Thomas Telford completed the work on the now famous landmark, Menai Suspension Bridge. The people who lived on Anglesey no longer had to rely on a perilous crossing by boat, and were officially linked to the Welsh mainland.

An unexpected, yet welcome feature of Anglesey’s castaway style location is the abundance of windmills scattered across the island in the 18th and 19th centuries. These wonderfully quirky buildings were designed in order to take full advantage of the strong westerly winds that swept across the island. As many as fifty windmills were thought to have been built during this time, sadly, they are now mostly ruins but a few shining examples remain – Melin Llynnon near the village of Llanddeusant is one of the very best.

Anglesey life didn’t just revolve around industry and farming; a rich and thriving culture was born here. From the legend of Dwynwn, the Welsh patron saint of lovers at Llanddwyn Island, to the origins of the royal Tudor dynasty at Penmyndd.

 Llanddwyn Island

Today, Anglesey is a hotspot for tourists; with thousands flocking to the island each year. With the highest concentration of prehistoric sites in Wales, the stunning coastline, and the panoramic views of Snowdonia, Anglesey is a haven that people rave about with good reason.

Summary
Discovering Anglesey - Self Catering Holidays on the Isle of Anglesey
Article Name
Discovering Anglesey - Self Catering Holidays on the Isle of Anglesey
Description
The Isle of Anglesey boasts 125 miles of glorious coastline which is best experienced on a walk along the Coastal Path. The majority of the region is classified as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Publisher Name
Lakehouse